Speech Therapy

Apraxia of Speech in Children

Apraxia of speech in children is a motor speech disorder. For unknown reasons, children who have apraxia of speech face difficulty forming and producing the specific, highly refined and precise series of movements of the palate, jaw, lips and tongue which are required for intelligible speech. This condition is also referred to as verbal dyspraxia, developmental apraxia of speech or verbal apraxia. Read on to know more about apraxia of speech in children.

Immaterial of what it is referred as, the most important point is the root word “praxis.” This means planned and synchronised movement. To a certain extent, a child diagnosed with apraxia of speech has problem with planning and programming speech movements. This condition is a specific speech disorder.

Causes of Speech Delay in Children

Apraxia of Speech in Children – An Overview

The main intention behind the act of speech is to communicate with others. After that an idea forms, which outlines what the speaker wants to say. Using the correct grammar, the words of he desired message are formed and put in the synchronised order. A specific sequence of sounds (also known as phonemes) and syllables are ordered together to form each word. This information about the sounds is then translated into a specific, coordinated motor movements of the soft palate, jaw, tongue and the lips.

Your brain must inform the muscles of “articulators” about the exact timing and order of movements. Hence, the words in the message are correctly articulated. Most importantly, the muscles must properly work with muscle tone and enough strength to carry out the movements needed for speech. When a child is growing up and developing the art of speech, he/she make word attempts and get feedback from others about their “articulation” of speech.

Children gradually learn whether the words produced by them is matching to the words they actually want to produce. They slowly “learn from their own experience.” Apraxia of speech in children causes a problem with their speech motor plans and programs. They find it difficult to access or form these speech programs and plans.

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