Speech Therapy

What Is Constructional Apraxia? – Its Causes And Symptoms

When working with a local NGO that was focusing on teaching street children I came across several kids who were unable to carry out simple commands though they were willing to. Constructional Apraxia is one such condition where the sufferer is unable to draw or copy a design to build a form even if they have the will and desire to. In simple words constructional apraxia is difficulties with functions related to art.

What Is It And What Causes It?
It is a condition where a person or a child finds it hard to arrange, build, and draw or design simple creative or art works. They find it difficult to construct a multi dimensional or two dimensional figures or patterns from single or one dimensional unit. The will to copy, draw or build is present and all the required basic neurological functions like seeing, observing, speaking, understanding, and performing with limbs are well preserved. The involved muscles are not weak, nor the will and determination to do the work is missing and still it is difficult to carry out simple and interesting tasks like drawing and painting.

Lesions on the inferior portion of the right parietal lobe of brain are one of the major reasons for the condition. Different lesions on affecting different parts of the brain will result in different symptoms. Any brain injury, illness, tumor or some condition that results in lesions on the brain can result in the condition.

Symptoms:

  • These lesions of brain can cause inability in a person or child to assemble units or small blocks, arrange them in a pattern, draw, and construct a design.
  • The lesions on the front or right side of the brain results in difficulties for the sufferer to copy and draw it or reproduce a similar pattern.
  • The arrangement of things or units to follow a pattern is in a disrupted fashion.

These are a few reasons and symptoms of constructional Apraxia. If you come across any child suffering from it then take that kid to a therapist at the earliest.

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